Top News in Brazil

Breastfed babies achieve more in life, have higher IQs and make more money, study finds

Naturalnews.com / By Sandeep Godiyal - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(NaturalNews) New research has shown a connection between breastfeeding and intelligence. Many mothers choose to breastfeed to bond with their baby, to provide optimum nutrition and for the convenience, but the lifetime effects go beyond this. Most people, researchers and doctors...

Human Stem Cells Shape a New Approach to Autism Research (Op-Ed)

Live Science - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
To better understand autism, researchers are now studying neurons crafted from the stem cells of patients.

Antibiotic effectiveness imperiled as use in livestock expected to increase

(e) Science News - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Antibiotic consumption in livestock worldwide could rise by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030, and possibly endanger the effectiveness of antimicrobials in humans, according to researchers from Princeton University, the International Livestock Research Institute, the Université Libre de Bruxelles...
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ScienceDaily - Antibiotic effectiveness imperiled as use in livestock expected to increase

Three drinks per day may raise liver cancer risk, but coffee lowers it

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
(HealthDay)— People who have three or more alcoholic drinks per day could be raising their odds for liver cancer, according to a report from a panel of experts.Ads from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader

For most children with HIV, low immune cell count, cells rebound after treatment

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after they begin treatment.

Two most destructive termite species forming superswarms in South Florida

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Two of the most destructive termite species in the world are swarming together in South Florida. They might mate, forming a hybrid, and that worries the UF/IFAS scientists who found the superswarm.

Superbug risk from tonnes of antibiotics fed to animals

New Scientist - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
A side of superbugs with your steak? Farm animals are fed 63,000 tonnes of antibiotics a year, exacerbating the problem of antibiotic resistanceAds from Inoreader:Remove ads • Advertise with Inoreader

'How Unromantic It Is To Die Of Tuberculosis In The 21st Century'

NPR / Salmaan Keshavjee - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
That's what a patient in Russia said a few years ago. In fact, 1.5 million people do die of the airborne infection each year. Here's what the world needs to do to fight this generally curable scourge.

Backup system that helps sustain liver during crisis discovered

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
An antioxidant system that helps sustain the liver when other systems are missing or compromised has been discovered by scientists.
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Medical Xpress - Research team discovers backup system that helps sustain liver during crisis

About That Breastfeeding Study

The Atlantic / Adrienne LaFrance - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
Breastfed babies may grow up to have higher intelligence and make more money than their formula-fed peers. That was the conclusion of a new study out of Brazil, and published in The Lancet this week, which found positive associations between breastfeeding, higher IQ, longer schooling, and higher ...
More from Telegraph, BBC, ScienceDaily, NPR, The Guardian, Medical Xpress
BBC - Breastfeeding 'linked to higher IQ'
Telegraph / Sarah Knapton - Breast-fed babies grow up smarter and richer, study shows
Medical Xpress - Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with higher adult IQ and earning ability
NPR / Rob Stein - Breast-Feeding Boosts Chances Of Success, Study In Brazil Finds
ScienceDaily - Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with higher adult IQ and earning ability
ScienceDaily - Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with higher adult IQ and earning ability
The Guardian / Sarah Boseley Health editor - The longer babies breastfeed, the more they achieve in life – major study

Using tablets to screen new, expecting moms for perinatal depression

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
University of Illinois social work researcher is collaborating with Champaign-Urbana Public Health District to administer perinatal depression screenings to low-income women.

Can buckyball ‘bombs’ blow up cancer?

Futurity / Robert Perkins-USC - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
In 1996, a trio of scientists won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their discovery of Buckminsterfullerene–soccer-ball-shaped spheres of 60 joined carbon atoms that exhibit special physical properties. Now, 20 years later, scientists have figured out how to turn them into buckybombs. These nan...
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ScienceDaily - Buckyballs become bucky-bombs, when aimed at cancer cells

Pau d'arco - A versatile and powerful herbal remedy for many health issues

Naturalnews.com / By Michael Edwards - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
(NaturalNews) What if you could treat and prevent a wide range of illness just by drinking tea or by swallowing a few drops of a powerful herbal extract? It turns out that you can, and this natural medicine has been in use for centuries.Pau d'arco, a tropical tree, has been used...

Phase 2b trial results of novel TB regimen show potential to shorten treatment

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
A new tuberculosis (TB) drug regimen designed to improve options for TB therapy eliminated more bacteria from sputum than standard therapy and did so at a faster rate, according to data from a phase 2b clinical trial. These results are published just as the global phase 3 clinical trial, designed...

Natural sleep cycles identified in rural community

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
A new study has identified a rural community in Brazil that still follows the earlier sleep and wake times similar to pre-industrial times. The team of researchers studied the population of Baependi, a small rural town in south-eastern Brazil, whose sleep/wake cycle is much more aligned with that...

The secret to an effortless, split-second slime attack

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 5 mins - Share :
Researchers explain why a tropical worm’s twin jets of paralyzing slime are anything but sluggish. The velvet worm is a slow-moving, unassuming creature. With its soft body, probing antennae, and stubby legs, it looks like a slug on stilts as it creeps along damp logs in tropical climates. But ...

17 million-year-old whale fossil provides first exact date for East Africa's puzzling uplift

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
A 17 million-year-old whale fossil provides the first exact date for East Africa's puzzling tectonic uplift, says paleontologists who rediscovered the fossil. The uplift and aridification associated with the Great Rift Valley of East Africa caused changes in vegetation and have been considered a ...

Birth weight and pregnancy complications associated with the enamel defects

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
A cross-sectional representative study aimed to assess the association between birth weight and severity of defects development of enamel (DDE) in the primary dentition. The sample was comprised 1,309 children five years of age, enrolled in kindergarten in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. ...

Antibiotic nanoparticles attack respiratory infection at source, reduce drug side effects

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Treating respiratory disease is often difficult because drugs have to cross biological barriers such as respiratory tissue and mucosa, and must therefore be given in large quantities in order for an effective amount to reach the target. Now researchers have shown that the use of nanoparticles to ...

Morquio Syndrome: 'Without the drug, I know I don’t have long left'

The Guardian / Eleanor Tucker - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Children and adults living with this rare and debilitating disease are facing an uncertain future, as a life-changing drug has been denied NHS fundingOne child in 25 in the UK is born with a genetic disorder, many of them extremely rare. Here, families share their stories about living with unusua...

Alternative way to pay for expensive drugs may be needed, analysis says

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
A major challenge facing the world's health care systems is paying for a new breed of expensive breakthrough drugs. One way to address the issue is to approach it the same way as other industries where suppliers encourage investment through approaches such as equipment leases or supplier-financed...

Welcome to the neighborhood: New dwarf galaxies discovered in orbit around the Milky Way

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
Astronomers have discovered a 'treasure trove' of rare dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way. The discoveries could hold the key to understanding dark matter, the mysterious substance which holds our galaxy together.

Stevia is a natural anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent

Naturalnews.com / By Dr. David Jockers - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
(NaturalNews) The native Indian tribe in Paraguay calls stevia "Kaa he-he" which means "sweet herb". The This local herb is believed to have been used for centuries by locals as a sweetener and for medicinal treatments. Stevia has been shown to not only contain a great flavor but...

Direct evidence that drought-weakened Amazonian forests 'inhale less carbon'

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Direct evidence of the rate at which individual trees in the Amazonian basin 'inhale' carbon from the atmosphere during severe drought has been provided by an international research team. Researchers found that while the rate of photosynthesis was constant among trees on plots unaffected by droug...

Amazon deforestation 'threshold' causes species loss to accelerate

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
One of the first studies to map the impact of deforestation on biodiversity across entire regions of the Amazon has found a clear ‘threshold’ for forest cover below which species loss becomes more rapid and widespread. By measuring the loss of a core tranche of dominant species of large and ...

Chagas Disease: The New Numbers

PLOS Blogs / Peter Hotez - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Peter Hotez (@PeterHotez), Co-Editor in Chief of PLOS NTDs, comments on new WHO estimates of the burden of Chagas disease in Latin America. The World Health Organization (WHO) has just released new estimates on the number of people living with … Continue reading »The post Chagas Disease: The N...

New research aims to refine increasingly popular plastic surgery procedures: Buttock augmentation and vaginal rejuvenation surgery

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Two of the fastest-growing plastic surgery procedures are gluteoplasty or "butt augmentation," to improve the appearance of the buttocks; and labiaplasty to address cosmetic and functional concerns with the vagina. New insights into the use and outcomes of these procedures are presented in a new ...

Living on the edge: Stars found far from galaxy center

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Astronomers using data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, have found a cluster of stars forming at the very edge of our Milky Way galaxy. This is the first time astronomers have found stars being born in such a remote location. Clouds of star-forming material at very high l...

“Vaccine Hesitancy”: The PLOS Currents Collection

PLOS Blogs / Peter Hotez - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Peter Hotez (@peterhotez), President of the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development, announces the launch of PLOS Currents Outbreaks collection on Vaccine Hesitancy. Measles was eliminated from the United States in 2000 – with elimination defined ...
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PLOS Blogs / Peter Hotez - What Kills Little Kids?

Children who watch TV for more than two hours a day 'at greater risk of high blood pressure'

Telegraph / Agency - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
Youngsters up to 10 who spend more than two hours a day in front of TV are 30pc more likely to have high blood pressure than those who do not, scientists discover
More from ScienceDaily
ScienceDaily - More than two hours of TV a day increases high blood pressure risk in children by 30%

Some sun damage happens after dark

Futurity / Ziba Kashef-Yale - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Melanin is known to protect the skin by blocking harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV) light. Now, a new study shows it may have carcinogenic effects as well. Exposure to UV light from the sun or from tanning beds can damage the DNA in melanocytes, the cells that make the melanin that gives skin its...
More from Telegraph, BBC, Science Magazine, Live Science, The Scientist, ScienceDaily, New Scientist, The Guardian, Medical Xpress
BBC - Sunlight harms skin for hours later
Telegraph / Sarah Knapton - Sunlight damages DNA even in the dark, Yale scientists find
Live Science - Out of the Sun? Ultraviolet Rays Can Harm Skin Hours Later
Medical Xpress - Sunlight continues to damage skin in the dark
New Scientist - UV rays damage skin hours after exposure to sun
ScienceDaily - Sunlight continues to damage skin in the dark
ScienceDaily - Sunlight continues to damage skin in the dark
Science Magazine - You can still get skin cancer in the shade
The Scientist - The Dark Side of Melanin
The Guardian / Hannah Devlin, science correspondent - Exposure to sun poses risk of skin cancer even in the dark, study finds
The Guardian / Hannah Devlin, science correspondent - Exposure to sun poses risk of skin cancer even in the dark, study finds

Garden hose a breeding ground for Legionnaires' disease

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
It is synonymous with an Aussie summer but the humble backyard hose could be a bacterial breeding ground, providing the ideal conditions for the organisms that cause Legionnaires' disease to flourish, UNSW research has revealed.

Chronic stress can wreak havoc on the body

Science News / Nathan Seppa - - Reading time 17 mins - Share :
Scientists are shedding light on all the ways that chronic stress can boost inflammation and lead to serious health problems.

Researchers looking at genetically modified spider venom to treat erectile dysfunction

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers working at the Catholic University of Korea has found that a protein found naturally in spider venom that can be created in the lab and tested on rats, can be effective in treating erectile dysfunction. In their paper published in the journal Urology, the ...

Newly discovered bacterial family may become a weapon in the fight against malaria

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
A new family of bacteria that are common in malaria mosquitoes has been described by researchers in a recent publication. Now, attempts are made to use these bacteria in the fight against malaria.

More infectious diseases emerging because of climate change

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 4 mins - Share :
The appearance of infectious diseases in new places and new hosts is a predictable result of climate change. Climate change brings humans, crops, wildlife and livestock into contact with new pathogens, which are more likely to jump from one host to another than scientists previously believed.

Of cancer and chaos: Single base mutation induces cancer-like gene profile and major unexpected impact on phenotype

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 6 mins - Share :
(Medical Xpress)—In chaos theory – the study of dynamical systems highly sensitive to initial conditions – was first described in 1890 by Henri Poincaré1, followed by work by Jacques Hadamard in 1898 and Pierre Duhem in 1908. Then, in his 1963 paper2, meteorologist Edward N. Lorenz theoret...

Author Sues Journal

The Scientist - - Reading time 1 mins - Share :
The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers.

Study identifies eight signs associated with impending death in cancer patients

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified eight highly specific physical and cognitive signs associated with imminent death in cancer patients. The findings, published in the journal Cancer, could offer clinicians the ability to better communicate with patie...

Leprosy maintains stubborn hold through infectious buddy system

Medical Xpress - - Reading time 3 mins - Share :
Leprosy is an ancient and debilitating infectious disease largely quelled with medicine in the past several decades. Yet its persistence in some developing countries has mystified scientists, who long have thought the bacteria that cause the disease cannot survive in the environment.

Mapping of the canary genome

ScienceDaily - - Reading time 2 mins - Share :
Nature lovers are fascinated by the increasing number of singing birds when spring is approaching. Scientists also take advantage of this seasonal phenomenon because they are able to investigate the underlying mechanism; however the evolutionary and molecularbiological background is largely unkno...